What Will Happen To My Credit Score if I Remove Myself as an Authorized User of Another Card? | CreditShout

What Will Happen To My Credit Score if I Remove Myself as an Authorized User of Another Card?

By Kevin / December 15, 2010

THIS PAGE MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS. MEANING WE RECEIVE COMMISSIONS FOR PURCHASES MADE THROUGH THOSE LINKS, AT NO COST TO YOU. PLEASE READ OUR DISCLOSURE FOR MORE INFO.

Credit Shout may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page.

Q: When I started college back in 2005, my mom added me as an authorized user to her credit card to help me establish a credit history and score. I have now graduated from college and am working full time. I am interested in opening my own credit card and removing myself as an authorized user on my mom’s credit card. What will happen to my credit score when I do this?

Here is one answer to this question. It should not be considered all-inclusive; however, it may shed some insight into the matter.

First of all, any time a person is removed as an authorized user on a credit card, that individual’s credit score will take a small “hit”. However, this is usually not very much. But, again, removal as an authorized user will have a slight negative impact on a credit score.

If the credit card account is in good standing, it’s best to remain as an authorized user on the account, as this is being reflected positively on your current history and score. This can be particularly important if this is the only entry or only one of a very few entries on your credit history. Removing something from an already brief history can have a fairly big impact on your score.

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any of the companies mentioned and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone. Additionally, the opinions of the commenters are not necessarily the opinions of this site

Leave a comment:


shares